Community Partnership Medical Scholars (CPMS)
Funded Projects to Date

Below is a list of Community Partnership Medical Scholars and their research projects.

A searchable database of student projects funded through CPMS and other sources can be found in the online Community Health Resource Center.

Prasanna Ananth

The impact of an Emergency Department (ED) -based educational intervention on pediatric asthma outcomes

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Ewen Wang, assistant professor, Surgery-Emergency Medicine

Community Advisor

Melissa Rogers, J.D., Legal Aid Society of San Mateo County

Study Summary

This is a prospective, randomized, controlled trial of an educational intervention on asthma outcomes in pediatric patients ages 5-17 presenting to the Stanford Emergency Department. An intervention combining an educational video with a written asthma action plan and medications will be piloted in the ED during summer 2004 in children with acute asthma exacerbations. Participants will be surveyed upon ED admission as well as 1 and 3 months following discharge on asthma knowledge, severity, and quality of life. It is hypothesized that children who are in the intervention will score higher on knowledge scores and quality of life scales, have a greater number of symptom-free days, and have fewer unscheduled visits to the ED 1 and 3 months following ED admission than children receiving standardized, usual care. Findings from this study will likely inform a more long-term prospective study of this intervention in the ED.

Quetzasol Chacon-Lopez

Linking underserved children to the health care system: The use of a mobile community health van

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Fernando Mendoza, professor, Department of Pediatrics

Community Advisor

Dr. Amanda Haiman, director, Pediatric Health Van

Study Summary

The principal aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the Health Van’s current efforts to improve health insurance enrollment of disadvantaged children in San Mateo County. The study will also examine: the Van’s effectiveness in facilitating access to permanent primary care providers; the association between personal characteristics and rates of health insurance enrollment; barriers to enrollment; and the change in parental knowledge and perceptions after interaction with the Van. Results will be disseminated to the Health Van staff and to the academic community

Annie Chao

Evaluating the Mexican Heritage Plaza Farmers’ Market as an obesity intervention tool in east San Jose, CA

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Lisa Chamberlain, clinical instructor, Department of Pediatrics

Community Advisor

Roy Melendez, director, Healthy Santa Clara County

Study Summary

This research seeks to evaluate a Farmers’ Market as a health intervention tool. This evaluation will be conducted in the form of an on-site cross-sectional survey, to be administered to 200 market visitors, 10 weeks into a newly established market in east San José. The survey is designed to elicit information about six sets of evaluation measures: demographic make-up of market participants, beliefs and attitudes towards eating fresh produce, consumption behavior in regards to fresh produce, utilization of and satisfaction with market resources, effectiveness of advertisements, and possible improvements for the Market’s role in fulfilling community health education needs.

Marisa Chavez

Using neighborhood-based focus groups to identify environmental psychosocial stressors and their influence on disparities in health

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Marilyn Winkleby, associate professor, Medicine, Stanford Prevention Research Center

Community Advisor

John Snider, MPH, chief, Division of Health Promotion, Monterey County Department of Health

Study Summary

This research focuses on the role that environmental psychosocial stressors, such as perceptions of neighborhood violence, play in mediating the relationship between the social and/or physical environment and mortality. It is part of a larger ongoing multilevel study examining the interrelationship of neighborhood social environment (e.g., neighborhood SES, crime rate), physical environment (e.g., housing conditions, availability of goods and services such as alcohol distributors, fast food restaurants, recreational facilities), individual health risk factors (e.g., smoking, psychosocial stress, health attitudes) and mortality currently being conducted by the Stanford Prevention Research Center.

Heather Fleharty

Neighborhood physical assessments: Examining the influence of neighborhoods on health

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Marilyn Winkleby, Associate Professor, Medicine, Stanford Prevention Research Center, Catherine Cubbin, Ph.D., research associate, Stanford Prevention Research Center

Community Advisor

John Snider, MPH, chief, Division of Health Promotion, Monterey County Department of Health

Study Summary

This research will assess the physical environments of three socioeconomically contrasting neighborhoods in Salinas, California. The data will be incorporated into a geographic information system (GIS) in order to compare residents’ perceptions of the same neighborhoods gained from previously conducted focus groups with the physical findings.It is part of a larger ongoing multilevel study examining the interrelationship of neighborhood social environment (e.g., neighborhood SES, crime rate), physical environment (e.g., housing conditions, availability of goods and services such as alcohol distributors, fast food restaurants, recreational facilities), individual health risk factors (e.g., smoking, psychosocial stress, health attitudes) and mortality currently being conducted by the Stanford Prevention Research Center.

Jamie Garcia

Assessing the needs of a low income Latino/a neighborhood in Southern California

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Cheryl Koopman, Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Community Advisor

Maricela Rios, MSW, FTG Project Director, Orange Children and Parents Together, Inc., Orange, CA

Study Summary

This research focuses on examining how acculturation differences within a “homogeneous” Latino population affect perceived community and health care needs, seeking to correlate three factors: 1) perceived community need, 2) perceived health care needs and 3) acculturation differences.

Sepideh Gholami
and
Leila Jazayeri

Understanding the knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors (KAB’s) of students (ages15-25) towards HIV/AIDS in Iran

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Andrew Zolopa, Associate Professor, Medicine – Division of Infectious Diseases

Community Advisor

Drs. Aresh and Amiar Alaie, advisors to the Ministries of Health and Education, directors of HIV/STD/IDU Counseling and Care, Center of Kermanshah and Shaheed Beheshtee, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.

Study Summary

The purpose of this study is assess to the KABs of high school and college students ages 15-25 towards HIV/AIDS and their views towards HIV educational programs. Standardized questionnaires addressing KABs towards HIV/AIDS will be distributed to males and females at two high schools and one university in order to compare knowledge and condom use between Iranian and US students, and to compare knowledge, sexual activity, and preferences towards HIV interventional education models amongst Iranian students. Surveys will be distributed and compared across four target groups: high school females, high school males, college females, and college males. Focus groups will be conducted to gain a more in-depth understanding of students’ ideas and the underlying Iranian cultural context of HIV/AIDS.

Courtney Griffiths

Understanding how Golden Valley Community Health Center’s Latina patients Perceive prenatal genetic testing

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Bertha Chen 

Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine

Community Advisor

Dr. Chris Grover, Golden Valley Health Center, Modesto, CA

Study Summary

This project will examine women’s perspectives of genetic testing during pregnancy and the information they feel they need to make informed decisions about participating in genetic testing. Pregnant patients of the Golden Valley Health Center will be asked to participate in focus groups and qualitative interviews examining their decisions to accept or decline testing, and what additional information they feel they need to make informed choices. The information gained will be analyzed to gain a better understanding of how to present prenatal testing options to patients at the Center.

Itamar Grunstein

Comparison of a new ultrasound-guided method versus blind palpation technique for insertion of radial artery catheters: a randomized, partially blinded, controlled clinical trial of efficacy and safety.

Assessment of endovaginal ultrasound probe contamination rates in an urban emergency department: a prospective cohort study.

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Swaminatha V. Mahadevan, Emergency Medicine, Department of Surgery

Community Advisor

Dr. Daniel Price, Attending Physician, Emergency Medical Department, Alameda County Medical Center – Highland Hospital, Oakland, CA

Study Summary

In this study we will test the hypothesis that a described ultrasound-guided method for radial artery catheter insertion will result in greater efficacy and patient safety than is obtained in conventional practice at Highland Hospital. The second part of this study will test the hypothesis that the described ultrasound-guided method for arterial blood gas sampling will result in greater efficacy and safety. The primary objective of the third, prospective part of the study is to determine the incidence of probe contamination following transvaginal ultrasonography. This data will be coupled to available community epidemiological data regarding prevalence of STDs to generate an estimate of the risk of nosocomial transmission of disease by means of transvaginal ultrasonography.

Lyen Huang
and
Sarah Juul

Addressing the mental health needs of children at Yerba Buena and Overfelt High Schools

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Chris Hayward, associate professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Community Advisor

Ann Hayes, associate director, School Health Clinics of Santa Clara County, Dan Moser, principal, Yerba Buena High School

Study Summary

The primary aim of this project is to gather qualitative data about students’ perceptions of depression and directly use the information to guide a school-based intervention for adolescents at risk for mental illness. Specifically, we plan to focus on how student perceptions of mental illness vary with their cultural or ethnic background and with gender. We will also examine how gender and cultural perceptions of mental illness can act as barriers to treatment.

Phuoc Le

Effect of video-based educational intervention on the compliance rate of Hepatitis B vaccinations in Vietnamese immigrants: A randomized controlled trial

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Gabriel Garcia, Department of Gastroenterology

Dr. Carol Barlage, Division of Family and Community Medicine

Community Advisor

Stephanie Chao, program coordinator, Asian Liver Center

Study Summary

Using a randomized controlled trial, this study will gather data on the impact of a video-based education intervention on the compliance rate of Hepatitis B vaccinations among Vietnamese immigrants. Parental knowledge, risk perceptions and anxiety about Hepatitis B will also be assessed. The target population is an area of East San Jose where there is a dense concentration of recent Vietnamese immigrants and the setting will be either a county clinic with a large proportion of Vietnamese patients or a Vietnamese family practitioner’s office. Results will be shared with experts in the field and if proven effective, CD-ROMs containing the video will be distributed to free clinics and physician offices.

Nicole Marsico

The Promotora and domestic violence: Defining the qualities of self-identified promotoras

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Ami Laws, Department of Medicine

Community Advisor

Cindy Urquidez, Sor Juana Ines: Services for Abused Women

Study Summary

Through a series of qualitative, semi-structured interviews with Latina survivors of domestic violence, this study will 1) elucidate key factors in the lives of Latina survivors of domestic violence that have enabled them to seek support services and survive abusive situations; 2) document ways in which these women are currently reaching out to other women and their communities; and 3) uncover key elements enabling these survivors to want to give back to their communities and other women facing domestic violence.

Mina Matin

Identifying barriers in the healthcare of Muslim women

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Samuel LeBaron, Division of Family and Community Medicine

Community Advisor

Shahed Amanullah and Diane Hafsah Al-Amin, Stepping Together

Study Summary

This study will document barriers to healthcare among Muslim women in America as well as the extent of knowledge physicians have of the particular needs of these women. Stepping Together, an organization that has served the Muslim population in the Bay Area since 1985, will be able to use the information generated by this research to tailor outreach projects and training programs for those who serve these communities and to generate more extensive community-based research.

Erin McDonald

Patient advocacy needs of older adult diabetes patients at Stanford Hospital

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Elliot Wolfe is the Director of the Office of Medical Student Professional Development, Dr. Samuel LeBaron, associate professor, Family and Community Medicine, director of the Center for Education in Family and Community Medicine

Community Advisor

Dr. Samuel LeBaron, Stanford Family Practice

Study Summary

As a first step in designing a patient advocacy curriculum for MD students, this study seeks to understand the effect of having an identifiable support system in the room during a patient visit and on the patient’s experience of that visit. It seeks to understand patients’ perceptions of patient-physician communication, understanding of diagnosis and prescriptions, patient compliance, and patient autonomy.

Stephen McKenna

Rapid HIV counseling and testing for couples in antenatal care clinics in Kigali and Lusaka

Faculty Advisors

Dr. Susan Allen, Associate Professor of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Birmingham, Alabama

Dr. David Katzenstein, Dept. of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine

Community Advisors

Dr. Moses Sinkala, Urban Health Project Officer, Zambian Ministry of Health

Dr. Etienne Karita, Head of Natl HIV/STD Reference Laboratory, Kigali, Rwanda

Study Summary

This study will take place in two cities with collaborative HIV research sites established for 14 years (Kigali, Rwanda) and 6 years (Lusaka, Zambia). We will conduct a randomized study of voluntary testing and counseling in pregnant women alone compared with couples’ voluntary testing and counseling. Technology transfer of rapid HIV testing and couples’ specific voluntary testing and counseling programs into ANC clinics will foster mutual reinforcement of heterosexual transmission prevention and mother to child transmission prevention goals.

Matt Mendenhall

Water in Malawi: The sustainability of shallow wells

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Ewen Wang, assistant professor, Surgery-Emergency Medicine

Community Advisor

Jim McGill, water and sanitation program coordinator, Church of Central Africa, Presbyterian, Malawi

Study Summary

The objective of this project is to understand what factors are necessary at the institutional and community levels to maintain a successful community health intervention. The research will focus on the capacity of the CCAP Shallow Wells Program to sustain functional wells in rural Malawi. The project will analyze institutional aspects of sustainability that vary regionally within Mzimba District, such as financial preparedness, the technical capacity of maintenance personnel, and the availability of spare parts. Additionally, the study will analyze community aspects of maintenance, including the motivation of maintenance men, the users’ faith in the handling of funds, the users’ knowledge of the maintenance system, support from local authorities, and community beliefs connecting protected water and health. The research will test each of these aspects as predictors of well success/failure to determine which aspects contribute most heavily to sustainability.

Ward A. Myers
and
Andrea Pomrehn

The control of malaria in East Sepik, Papua New Guinea: A survey of the preventive and treatments strategies and the assessment of the prevalence of plasmodial species and genotypes

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Robert Siegel, Department of Microbiology and Immunology

Community Advisor

Paul Moses, Health Aid, East Sepik, Papua New Guinea

Study Summary

Partnered with health aid workers from the region, this project aims to reduce the impact of malaria within the communities of the East Sepik province. The study’s specific aims are to 1) reinforce and extend the curriculum on malaria used by the Stanford Papua New Guinea Medical Project; 2) determine the p revalence and demographic distribution of plasmodial species and genotypes; and 3)generate and convey additional recommendations for prevention of malaria in the East Sepik region.

Rosalyn Nguyen

Cardiovascular disease risks factors in Vietnamese

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Christopher Ta, Department of Ophthalmology

Community Advisor

Doug Flores, American Health Association, Texas Affiliate

Study Summary

This project will analyze risk factors for heart disease in the large Vietnamese community of Houston via local health screenings (measuring blood pressure, glucose, cholesterol) and surveying participants about their acculturation levels, access to healthcare, lifestyle habits and exposure to health information. The goal of the research is to identify the groups most in need of medical care and patient education, to identify the risk factor areas that could benefit from health interventions, and to alert individuals of the need for lifestyle changes and/or checkups. Results will be disseminated to the American Heart Association and local community organizations and the academic community to inform health care interventions.

Lance Okeke

The effects of the Pipeline Project on participants’ interests and opinions of the health professions

Faculty Advisor

Ronald Garcia, Ph.D., senior lecturer, Family and Community Medicine

Community Advisor

Lucy Berlin, M.S., Young Moms with Breast Cancer, San José, CA

Study Summary

The primary objective of this research is to assess the extent to which HCOP’s Pipeline curriculum affected participants’ motivation to pursue health related careers and their willingness to partake in activities towards that goal.

Neethi Panicker

Pediatricians as child advocates: The past, present and future

Faculty Advisors

Dr. Theodore Sectish, Department of Pediatrics

Professor Michael Wald, School of Law

Community Advisors

Dr. Lisa Chamberlain, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford

Study Summary

This project focused on the origin and history of child advocacy efforts within the field of pediatrics. The study summarized recommendations for residency training in child advocacy, described results of a survey evaluating existing or planned child advocacy curricula in pediatric residency programs, and discussed multidisciplinary strategies for training professionals to become effective child advocates.

Gina Perez-Baron

The effects of Outervention: A wilderness-based family-systems long-term therapeutic approach for reaching adolescent girls at risk

Faculty Advisor

Hans Steiner, professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Community Advisor

Erica Cicero, Outervention

Study Summary

Outervention utilizes a wilderness-based therapeutic approach to provide long-term, family systems intervention that is both gender-specific and community-based. While much anecdotal evidence points to the success of the Outervention model, no efficacy data have been available. In this first clinical analysis, Outervention’s success in targeting at-risk adolescent girls will be evaluated, as will the success of the multi-faceted treatment approach in positively affecting the attitudes and life skills that have been linked to negative health behaviors and outcomes in this population. Results will directly impact program planning and will be shared with the adolescent outreach and adolescent medicine communities as well as other community-based organizations.

Michelle Rhee

Knowledge of malaria and use of malaria prevention measures following an insecticide-treated bednet community program in Piron, Mali

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Julie Parsonnet, Associate Professor of Medicine (Infectious Disease and Geographic Medicine) and Health Research and Policy

Community Advisor

Dr. Ogobara Duombo, Director of Malaria Research and Training, University of Mail, and Advisor, National Malaria Control Program, Mail

Study Summary

This project involves the implementation and assessment of a village level educational intervention designed to promote insecticide-treated net (ITN) use as a means to prevent malaria. The education and training program seeks to improve knowledge among villagers about malaria transmission and prevention, promote the adoption of ITNs as a method of malaria prevention, and help women socially and economically by training them to take on the responsibilities of the bednet-treatment program. Using pre- and post intervention questionnaires and interviews, the assessment will seek to determine how to what extent the villagers’ knowledge, attitudes and practices surrounding malaria transmission and prevention have changed because of the educational health promotion program.

Daniel Sanchez

Disenrollment from California’s SCHIP: Examining barriers to retention

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Fernando Mendoza, professor, Department of Pediatrics

Community Advisor

Janie Tyre, v.p. marketing, Santa Clara County Family Health Plan (SCCFHP)

Study Summary

The purposes of this study are to: 1) analyze and compare the reasons for disenrollment of patients from SCCFHP’s Healthy Kids and Healthy Families programs, 2) interview recently terminated families to determine why they were disenrolled from the Healthy Families program, and 3) examine the Healthy Families program’s processes of renewal and premium payments to determine to what degree they influence disenrollments. The results of the study will be used to inform implementation of policies designed to increase Healthy Families member retention and inform the literature on disenrollment in California’s SCHIP.

Matthew Siegel

Effects of a comprehensive health education curriculum on the health knowledge and attitudes of 12th grade students

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Robert Siegel, Department of Microbiology and Immunology

Community Advisor

Dr. Tien-Wen Wiedemann, Health Education for Life Partnership (H.E.L.P.) for Kids

Study Summary

The goal of this project was to evaluate the impact of a comprehensive health education curriculum on the knowledge and attitudes of local 12th grade students who lack a structured health education program. Working in conjunction with a community partner, H.E.L.P. for Kids, an age-appropriate health curriculum was developed and taught utilizing interactive techniques and an emphasis on the behavioral basis of many long-term health complications. The students were offered a pre- and post-intervention test of health knowledge and attitude to assess the efficacy of the program.

Marie Soller

An investigation of the Arbor Free Clinic and determinants of patient satisfaction

Faculty Advisor

Randy Stafford, Stanford Center for Research and Disease Prevention

Community Advisor

Dr. Lars Osterberg, Medical Director, Arbor Free Clinic

Study Summary

The goals of this project are to obtain quality data regarding the demographic makeup of Arbor’s patient population; quantify the ability of Arbor to meet the needs of its patient population; assess patient satisfaction with the full spectrum of Arbor’s services; and evaluate the factors that determine patient satisfaction. Results of the project will be disseminated to Arbor, San Mateo County, and to other free clinics via the literature. They will also be used to generate recommendations for changes in Arbor’s services and systems.

Kavita Trivedi

Nutritional status of reproductive-aged women of low socioeconomic status in Gujarat, India: Analysis and practical interventions

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Usha Chitkara, Professor of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine

Community Advisor

Dr. Leela Trivedi, Professor of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Pramukhswami Medical College, Karamsad, Gujarat, India

Study Summary

This study will be conducted in partnership with the Amdavad Women's Action Group (AWAG), which serves socioeconomically disadvantaged women in Amdavad, Gujarat, India. Utilizing an action research protocol applied to nutrition interventions in Africa (The "Triple A" cyclic process of assessment, analysis and action), this study seeks to yield information that will enable AWAG to institute long-term change in nutritional knowledge and practice within its community.

Rebecca Weintraub

Evaluating the accuracy of administrative and clinical data on homelessness at an urban county hospital

Faculty Advisor

Peter Rudd, professor, Department of Internal Medicine

Community Advisor

Dr. Margot Kushel, Department of Medicine, San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH)

Study Summary

Homelessness is associated with increased risks of morbidity and mortality, decreased use of primary health care and increased use of emergency department and inpatient care. Although homelessness is recognized as a health risk, it is not a clearly defined concept. This study will use a "day census" of all inpatients at SFGH as well as chart review to assess the accuracy of both the administrative data and clinical awareness of a patient’s housing status. The results will be used to build larger-scale studies, to inform changes in the way housing data are collected in order to improve accuracy and completeness of data, and to develop trainings on homelessness and housing issues for medical students and residents.

Amy Wu

Use of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) among a Chinese population in Northern California

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Erika Schillnger, clinical assistant professor, Family and Community Medicine, Dr. Samuel LeBaron, associate professor, Family and Community Medicine, director of the Center for Education in Family and Community Medicine

Community Advisor

Dr. Daniel Chan, director, North East Medical Services, San Francisco, CA

Study Summary

The primary overall objective of this project is to obtain data regarding the prevalence of TCM and Western Medicine use among a defined subpopulation of Chinese patients in Northern California. The second objective is to evaluate the frequency with which a sample of physicians in the Bay Area ask their patients questions regarding their TCM use and the amount of training these physicians have in TCM.

Fay Xing

Young women’s experiences and needs related to ovarian function after chemotherapy

Faculty Advisor

Dr. Lynn Westphal, assistant professor, Obstetrics and Gynocololgy

Community Advisor

Lucy Berlin, M.S., Young Moms with Breast Cancer, San José, CA

Study Summary

The primary goal of this study is to understand the needs and experiences of young women with newly diagnosed breast cancer regarding chemotherapy-related ovarian damage and post-treatment fertility issues. Semi-structued interviews and a survey will be employed to explore survivors’ attitudes towards ovarian protection, the impact of potential ovarian toxicity, and chemotherapy decisions.


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